GENTRIFICATION COMES IN DIFFERENT WAYS -  THAT INCLUES EDUCATION

Gov. Cuomo says state will pony up $1.6B to fully fund CUNY next year, taking the city off the hook for $485M payment.

 

 BY KENNETH LOVETT / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Updated Friday, March 25, 2016 / 6:22 AM

ALBANY - Gov. Cuomo has backed off his push to shift $485 million in state CUNY costs on to the city.

 

Cuomo spokeswoman Dani Lever Thursday said the state will foot the entire $1.6 billion in government operating costs for CUNY as long as the state Legislature agrees to hire a management efficiency expert to look for savings at the city and state university systems.

Cuomo in his budget plan unveiled in January had proposed shifting a third of the state's CUNY costs on to the city.

 

CUNY ADVOCATES TARGET CUOMO, LEGISLATURE IN FUNDING PUSH

 

Originally, Cuomo aides argued that the city appoints a third of CUNY's board members so should pick up a third of the costs.

 Schooling of America's children has always been a political endeavor.  The question before decision makers has been and continues to be, "Who shall be educated and reap the benefits of schooling" (Warner, Havihurst, & Loeb, 1944)?  Access hinging solely on merit implies those granted opportunities deserve favor because of something of value or worth they demonstrate.  As reflected in the opening quote, benefits accrue to these individuals who are already beneficiaries of adequate educational preparation.  Conversely, failure to address inadequacies in precollege schooling relegates those who have the potential to achieve to to perpetural disenfranchisement.

 

There are always intended and unintended consequences associated with policy shifts, and changes in admissions practices are not exempt.  Rewarding merit in practice has many pseudonyms in the college admissions process to include higher standards and individual accountability.  Terminology nothwithstanding, the rhetoric surrounding merit has resulted in treatment of excellece and equity as mutually exclusive commodities in some educational circles.  Moves to substantively increase higher education entry-level requirements in New York, California, Texas, Maine, and other states has disproportionately restricted higher educational opportunity for persons of color and the poor in general and for African Americans and Hispanics in particular (Evangelouf, 1999).

 What It Takes to Get Into New York City's Best Public Colleges

An increasing emphasis on SAT scores is making it harder for black and Latino students to go to CUNY's top five schools

 

LynNell Hancock and Meredith Kolodner - Jan 13 2015, 8:00 AM ET

Since it went through an aggressive, system-wide overhaul that began in 2000, the City University of New York’s top five colleges—Baruch, Hunter, Brooklyn, Queens, and City—have been raising admission standards and enrolling fewer freshmen from New York City high schools. Among the results has been the emergence of a progressively starker two-tier system: CUNY’s most prestigious colleges now increasingly favor Asian and white freshmen, while the system’s black and Latino students end up more and more in its overcrowded two-year community colleges.

 

CUNY officials insist that the school is as committed as ever to its “deeply rooted tradition” of serving New York’s diverse needs. “CUNY provides educational opportunity to New Yorkers as a system, not as a group of colleges,” says Julia Wrigley, the interim vice chancellor and provost. She argues that the majority of graduates in the selective colleges don’t enter as freshman but as transfer students from other colleges who enter as sophomores, juniors, or seniors. “Transfer provides an important means of access,” Wrigley notes. Students transferring from other colleges are not required to meet SAT benchmarks.

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT - HOW MANY NON-RESIDENTS ARE RECIEVING EXCELSIOR SCHOLARSHIP WHO ARE ACTUALLY RESIDING ON CITY AND STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS?

New York is now home to the Nation's first accessible college program -  that caters to middle class families and newly arrived New Yorkers

                                   CONTACT YOUR STATE REPRESENTATIVE AND DEMAND CHANGES TO EXCELSIOR

                                            

Under this groundbreaking initiative, the Excelsior Scholarship, in combination with other student-financial aid programs, allows students to attend a SUNY or CUNY college tuition-free.

Recipients of the Excelsior Scholarship may receive up to $5,500 or actual tuition, whichever is less. The maximum Excelsior Scholarship will be reduced by the amount of certain other student financial aid awards which an applicant has or will receive for the academic year including a New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) award and/or federal Pell grant.

A recipient of an Excelsior Scholarship is eligible to receive award payments for not more than two years of full-time undergraduate study in a program leading to an associate's degree or four years of full-time undergraduate study, or five years if the program of study normally requires five years in a program leading to a bachelor's degree.

You must live in New York State for the length of time you received the award. Failure to meet these requirements will result in the conversion of your award to a no-interest loan.

What You Need

To complete the application you will need:

  • Copies of 2015 New York State income tax return(s) filed by you and your parent(s) or your spouse, as applicable

  • Your current unofficial college transcript showing the number of credits you earned each year prior to applying for this program if you have previously attended college.

  • Your Student Aid Report (SAR), which you received when you filed your completed FASFA.

Application Deadline: July 21, 2017

Eligibility

An applicant must:

  • be a resident of NYS and have resided in NYS for 12 continuous months prior to the beginning of the term;

  • be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen;

  • have either graduated from high school in the United States, earned a high school equivalency diploma, or passed a federally approved "Ability to Benefit" test, as defined by the Commissioner of the State Education Department;

  • have a combined federal adjusted gross income of $100,000 or less;

  • be pursuing an undergraduate degree at a SUNY or CUNY college, including community colleges and the statutory colleges at Cornell University and Alfred University;

  • be enrolled in at least 12 credits per term and complete at least 30 credits each year (successively), applicable toward his or her degree program;

  • if attended college prior to the 2017-18 academic year, have earned at least 30 credits each year (successively), applicable toward his or her degree program prior to applying for an Excelsior Scholarship;

  • be in a non-default status on a student loan made under any NYS or federal education loan program or on the repayment of any NYS award;

  • be in compliance with the terms of the service condition(s) imposed by a NYS award that you have previously received; and

  • execute a Contract agreeing to reside in NYS for the length of time the award was received, and, if employed during such time, be employed in NYS.

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